Recent Changes

Friday, August 31

  1. page HorizonReportsNav edited Horizon Reports 2010 Horizon Report 2010 Horizon Report: Museum Edition 2010 Horizon Report: …

    Horizon Reports
    2010 Horizon Report
    2010 Horizon Report: Museum Edition
    2010 Horizon Report: Australia-New Zealand Edition
    2010 Horizon Report: Edición Iberoamericana
    2010 Horizon Report: K-12 Edition
    2009 Horizon Report
    2009 Horizon Report: K-12 Edition
    2009 Horizon Report: Australia-New Zealand Edition
    2009 Horizon Report: Economic Development Edition
    2008 Horizon Report
    2008 Horizon Report: Australia-New Zealand Edition
    2007 Horizon Report
    2006 Horizon Report
    2005 Horizon Report
    2004 Horizon Report

    (view changes)
    12:08 pm
  2. page WhatsNew edited ... What's New? We're done! The NMC Horizon Report > 2011 Museum Edition was officially releas…
    ...
    What's New?
    We're done! The NMC Horizon Report > 2011 Museum Edition was officially released at the MCN Conference in Atlanta!
    ...
    see it here! {2011-Horizon.Museum-Shortlist.pdf} here! {2011-Horizon.Museum-Shortlist.pdf}
    The first
    ...
    are the tallies {RQ tallies {RQ tallies 2011
    If you need a tour of the wiki, see the screencast in the Getting Started area.
    (view changes)
    12:07 pm

Wednesday, February 8

  1. page home edited The Archive of the NMC Horizon [[include component="page" page="HorizonReports…

    TheArchive of the NMC Horizon
    [[include component="page" page="HorizonReportsNav"]]
    Welcome to the workspace for the New Media Consortium's Horizon.Museum Project. This space is a place for the members of the Horizon.Museum Advisory Board to manage the process of selecting the topics for the NMC Horizon Report: 2011 Museum Edition. The annual report is produced by The New Media Consortium. The report focuses on emerging technology and its applications to museum education and interpretation. This year will be the second year of publication for the Museum Edition.
    (view changes)
    9:37 am
  2. page Wireless Power edited What is Wireless Power? [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav"]] Anyo…

    What is Wireless Power?
    [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav"]]
    Anyone who attends a class or meeting where most of the participants have laptop computers is well aware that there are never enough power outlets — and when they are available, they are invariably located in inconvenient places. Wireless power, already being prototyped by several companies, promises to alleviate the problem by making power for charging batteries in devices readily available. Using near-field inductive coupling, power can be transmitted through special surfaces or even through open space to charge devices within a home, office, school, or other setting. Consumer products are already entering the market; the Powermat, for instance, charges up to three devices placed onto its surface (each device must first be slipped into a compatible sleeve). Fulton Innovation's eCoupled technology is designed to be built into desk and countertops, enabling not only power transfer but also other wireless communications between devices placed on the surfaces. Witricity is developing transmitters that would be embedded in walls or other furniture, transferring power via inductive coupling to receivers attached to devices anywhere within the home or classroom. However, it is important to note that there have been health risks associated with using wireless power that need to be resolved before wide-scale adoption.
    INSTRUCTIONS: Enter your responses to the questions below. This is most easily done by moving your cursor to the end of the last item and pressing RETURN to create a new bullet point. Please include URLs whenever you can (full URLs will automatically be turned into hyperlinks; please type them out rather than using the linking tools in the toolbar).
    Please "sign" your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples- this produces a signature when the page is updated, like this: Sam Jul 21, 2011
    (1) How might this technology be relevant to the museums you know best?
    I voted for this last year because I think this would be so helpful. When is it going to happen? At the Seattle Art Museum we were limited by both the lack of power and cabling, which made implementing interpretive tools difficult if not prohibitive. I believe interpretative technology in the physical museum spaces would be completely different--mobile, ubiquitous, shareable, if we had wireless power. christina.depaolo Aug 21, 2011
    david.dean Aug 30, 2011As the prevalence of mobile devices becomes more and more ubiquitous in daily life, the need for continuous energy to power the devices will become more essential. Also, with the power requirements for many mobile devices becoming less, broadcast, RF energy capture, motion-generated, and induction power will be more practical as well. For museums, as they adopt/adapt the technologies of readily available and interactive information transfer using the more efficient and mobile devices, the provision of available energy to visitors will be an imperative and a reasonable expectation.
    The more mobile we become, the more important wireless power becomes. Susan Hazan from the Israel Museum has been trialing a wireless power solution. In the absence of wireless power, museums should start integrating charging stations for mobile and portable devices into their public spaces. It's a great opportunity to create lounging areas and dwell spaces to enhance the sense of community and quality of visitor experience on site. nancy.proctor Sep 1, 2011
    Another perspective here.
    (2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
    Add your perspective here...
    david.dean Aug 30, 2011As with some many of the emerging technologies, the missing element is how these technologies integrate with each other to provide a "cyber-envelope" or "cyber-environment" that an individual carries about with them. Readily available and portable power only has relevance as it applies to those devices that require it.
    Another perspective here.
    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on education and interpretation in museums?
    Add your perspective here...
    david.dean Aug 30, 2011Coupled with the myriad emerging technological capabilities made available by various devices examined in this Horizon Report, the ready availability of electrical energy to power the devices will enable a more immersive and stress-free (lacking the stress of locating power outlets as one's devices begin to fail) environment for the visitor/learner. Focus will shift from finding or positioning oneself where a power outlet is available to being involved in the learning experience.
    Another perspective here.
    (4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?
    Add your perspective here...
    Another perspective here.
    [[include component="page" page="Project Form Link"]]

    (view changes)
    9:36 am
  3. page WhatsNew edited What's New? We're done! The NMC Horizon Report > 2011 Museum Edition was officially released…

    What's New?
    We're done! The NMC Horizon Report > 2011 Museum Edition was officially released at the MCN Conference in Atlanta!
    The NMC Horizon Report: 2011 Museum Edition Shortlist is ready -- see it here! {2011-Horizon.Museum-Shortlist.pdf}
    The first round of voting is completed! Here are the tallies {RQ tallies 2011 Horizon.museum.pdf} .
    If you need a tour of the wiki, see the screencast in the Getting Started area.

    (view changes)
    9:36 am
  4. page Web Aggregation Tools edited What are Web Aggregation Tools? [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav"…

    What are Web Aggregation Tools?
    [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav" ]]
    Aggregation is the process of transparently gathering together distributed pieces of online content based on an interest in the topic(s), the author(s), or other shared characteristics. RSS readers are one way to aggregate data, but with the increase in personal publishing, new tools for aggregation are emerging. Using these tools, readers can easily track a distributed conversation that takes place across blogs, Twitter, and other publishing platforms, as well as pull in relevant resources from news feeds and other sources. Some educators and students are seeking alternatives to course management systems, preferring to open their discussions and make use of a variety of tools instead. Aggregation can reunite course discussions that once took place within CMS forums, even if they are scattered among different platforms and tools. Aggregation can allow a class to visualize its conversations in new ways. Information is available when and where the reader wishes, in almost any desired format.
    INSTRUCTIONS: Enter your responses to the questions below. This is most easily done by moving your cursor to the end of the last item and pressing RETURN to create a new bullet point. Please include URLs whenever you can (full URLs will automatically be turned into hyperlinks; please type them out rather than using the linking tools in the toolbar).
    Please "sign" your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples- this produces a signature when the page is updated, like this: alan Jan 27, 2010
    (1) How might this technology be relevant to the museums you know best?
    You can bring real-time conversations and research together in a more immediate way than ever before, perhaps in the context of an actual object or exhibition. Museum sites can be portals that bring together this information with the foundation of curatorial and scholarly research. And equally, can disseminate this information out. allegra.burnette May 3, 2010
    another response here
    What is 3D Video?-(2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?(2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
    Imagery can also be pulled into this through semantic web.allegra.burnette May 3, 2010
    another response here
    What is 3D Video?-(3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on education and interpretation in museums?(3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on education and interpretation in museums?
    Changes the way we teach, and also opens up new opportunities for online courses in museums. And expands the contexts in which interpretation takes place.allegra.burnette May 3, 2010
    another response here
    What is 3D Video?-(4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?(4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?
    [[include component="page" page="Project Form Link" ]]

    (view changes)
    9:36 am
  5. page Watch Lists edited [[include component="page" page="PressClippingsNav"]] Press Clippings: Publis…
    [[include component="page" page="PressClippingsNav"]]
    Press Clippings: Published Technologies to Watch Lists
    This area is a place to collect "Technologies to Watch" lists published by other organizations. Though these lists and publications may serve a different audience and purpose than the Horizon Report does, they contain many useful descriptions and discussions that can and should inform our work.
    We'd love to see your clippings here as well! Please use the edit this page button to add more, or add comments on how or why you think they may or may not be important. As is the convention throughout the Horizon Project Wiki, we ask you to identify items you think are of high interest to us, as I have done here by typing 4 tilde (~) characters-- Sam Apr 14, 2011 (note - to keep the wiki clean, please put spaces on either side of your marks). This will help us to sift through the articles and determine which ones resonate most strongly with the board as a whole.
    Recommended Reading
    5 Trends that Will Shape the Next Few Years of Social Media
    http://thenextweb.com/socialmedia/2010/09/19/5-trends-that-will-shape-the-next-few-years-of-social-media/
    "The past few years have seen some spectacular changes in the technology that embeds itself in our daily lives. The perfect storm of social media, smart phones and location awareness is only beginning to take full effect. We’ve gazed into crystal ball and considered how we think these technologies will combine to become such an established fabric of our lives that in the next few years what we’ve written here won’t be considered amazing at all..." Larry Apr 25, 2011 nik.honeysett Aug 10, 2011 ed.rodley Aug 13, 2011 rob.lancefield Aug 14, 2011 Nothing in this article surprises me - and that worries me. Is the future truly going to be so predictable? nancy.proctor Aug 14, 2011 True convergance will occur once credit card transactions are as simple as our social transactions susan.hazan Aug 16, 2011.
    JWT Intelligencehttp://www.jwtintelligence.com/trendletters2/
    http://www.jwtintelligence.com/2011-and-beyond/ Sometimes it helps to telescope back at broader trends or trends just outside our museum and technology fields of vision. These "Trendletters" and "2011 and beyond" report do just that. len.steinbach Aug 15, 2011
    5 Web Technologies and Trends to Watch in 2011
    http://mashable.com/2011/01/05/web-technologies-2011/
    Mashable takes an in-depth look at the advancing web technologies with this most promise in 2011.
    8 Apps for Art Fanatics
    http://ipad.appstorm.net/roundups/entertainment-roundups/8-apps-for-art-fanatics/
    This post examines 8 of the most well designed museum/art apps available for iPads right now.holly Aug 8, 2011love MOMA books and Zen brush. The Monet and Van Gogh HD are good and of course the ideal is always more, better images in higher resolution. The other apps already feel a bit outdated to me.
    Gartner Identifies the Top 10 Strategic Technologies for 2011
    http://www.gartner.com/it/page.jsp?id=1454221
    Gartner's list of strategic technologies to watch includes different types of data analytics, coupled with the ubiquitous computing the cloud offers. Larry Apr 25, 2011holly Aug 8, 2011our appetite for the new and the better is now out of control. I want all of these strategic technologies functional (and they pretty much are) but what hasn't yet caught up is the content I want. :( nik.honeysett Aug 10, 2011 rob.lancefield Aug 14, 2011 erin.coburn Aug 14, 2011 allegra.burnette Aug 15, 2011 susan.hazan Aug 16, 2011~
    Gartner Outlines 10 Mobile Technologies to Watch in 2010 and 2011
    http://www.mobilemarketingandtechnology.com/2010/toppost/gartner-outlines-10-mobile-technologies-to-watch-in-2010-and-2011/
    Gartner outlines the top mobile technologies to watch in 2010-2011 nik.honeysett Aug 10, 2011 erin.coburn Aug 14, 2011 allegra.burnette Aug 15, 2011 I wonder when Gartner will stop refering to 'mobile technologies' as a separate subset susan.hazan Aug 16, 2011
    Seven Technologies that will Rock 2011
    http://techcrunch.com/2011/01/02/seven-technologies-that-will-rock-2011/
    "So here we are in a new decade, and the technologies that are now available to us continue to engage (and enthrall) in fascinating ways. The rise and collision of several trends—social, mobile, touch computing, geo, cloud—keep spitting out new products and technologies which keep propelling us forward." Larry Apr 25, 2011 --Agree. The most successful technologies must strategically encompass a blend of multiple important technologies, the way tablets do, for example.Sam Apr 25, 2011 ed.rodley Aug 13, 2011 Mostly agree with this article, but I wonder if its inclusion of Quora may reflect its January publication (did a lot of us in the museum sector have a brief New Year's Quora Moment and then taper off there, or was that just me backsliding? I believe in it, but where's the time...). rob.lancefield Aug 14, 2011 erin.coburn Aug 14, 2011 Yah, I'm disappointed that Quora hasn't taken off more. There will be interesting learnings for other platforms as well if we can figure out why. I agree it's probably NOT one to watch. nancy.proctor Aug 14, 2011
    Ten Tablets to Keep an Eye On in 2011
    http://www.businessweek.com/technology/content/jan2011/tc20110110_523923.htm
    Business Week cites the Motorola Xoom and ASUS Ee Pad Transformer among the top tablets for 2011. --More than anything, this article reflects the importance of the tablet this year. Tablets are transforming the way students learn in school.Sam Apr 25, 2011
    Top Technologies to Watch in 2011, Part 1
    http://www.informationweek.com/news/global-cio/trends/228901589
    Alexander Wolfe predicts the death of desktop computing, among other IT trends in 2011.
    Top 10 Mobile Internet Trends
    http://www.slideshare.net/kleinerperkins/kpcb-top-10-mobile-trends-feb-2011
    These slides explore the opportunities that lie ahead for the dissemination of information through mobile apps and browsing. nik.honeysett Aug 10, 2011 ed.rodley Aug 13, 2011
    Google Art and similar collaborative platforms: I don't know that Google Art per se will triumph, but I think it has made certain kinds of collaboration and content sharing for the benefit of online audiences more concrete for museums, and hopefully will impact the way we work going forward. It's kind of embarrassing that it took an outside mega-corporation to get us enabling people to create "collections" across museums. There were of course several false starts before Google Art, and GA won't survive either unless Google decides to make it an on-going charitable activity (I don't see how even ad revenue on museum content - assuming museums were to permit that - would generate enough money to expand and maintain GA in the long term.). But it would be appropriate for international charitable foundations to fund this sort of common platform for art and other disciplines. Here are my other thoughts on why Google Art (phase 1) was so important. NB this had mainly to do with the gigapixel scans and interior "streetviews", which are the most expensive features. http://www.curatorjournal.org/archives/489 nancy.proctor Aug 14, 2011 no one does Street view like Google - who else has the ability? susan.hazan Aug 16, 2011

    (view changes)
    9:36 am
  6. page Visual Data Analysis edited What is Visual Data Analysis? [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav"]]…

    What is Visual Data Analysis?
    [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav"]]
    Visual data analysis blends highly advanced computational methods with sophisticated graphics engines to tap the extraordinary ability of humans to see patterns and structure in even the most complex visual presentations. Currently applied to massive, heterogeneous, and dynamic datasets, such as those generated in studies of astrophysical, fluidic, biological, and other complex processes, the techniques have become sophisticated enough to allow the interactive manipulation of variables in real time. Ultra high-resolution displays allow teams of researchers to zoom into interesting aspects of the renderings, or to navigate along interesting visual pathways, following their intuitions and even hunches to see where they may lead. New research is now beginning to apply these sorts of tools to the social sciences as well, and the techniques offer considerable promise in helping us understand complex social processes like learning, political and organizational change, and the diffusion of knowledge.
    INSTRUCTIONS: Enter your responses to the questions below. This is most easily done by moving your cursor to the end of the last item and pressing RETURN to create a new bullet point. Please include URLs whenever you can (full URLs will automatically be turned into hyperlinks; please type them out rather than using the linking tools in the toolbar).
    Please "sign" your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples- this produces a signature when the page is updated, like this: Sam Jul 21, 2011
    (1) How might this technology be relevant to the museums you know best?
    holly Aug 20, 2011On a simple level visual data analysis could help museums with communication issues. Many museum people are visual thinkers. Visual data analysis could be of tremendous use internally to allow non-visual thinkers to communicate non-visual topics (budgets, conservation issues, audience demographics, etc) to visual thinkers. On a more complex level I think the sky is the limit on the utility of this technology for all types of museums. beth.harris Aug 24, 2011
    christina.depaolo Aug 21, 2011We are creating more data then ever before and there is a need to be able to look at it and understand it beyond the non-visual tools we have been using. I think we can learn alot to be able to see patterns and trends we would otherwise miss. Cultural institutions has been gathering data in databases for at least 15-20 years. Just think what we could learn from some thoughtful visual analysis of that data. Relationships we may never have imagined.
    rob.stein Aug 30, 2011 Visualization is important in its ability to communicate complex interrelationships between multivariate datasets. Museums have frequently used visual techniques like timelines and maps to communication about the temporal or spatial relationships for different kinds of data. As our visual culture matures and becomes more accustomed to seeing new kinds of infographics and information visualization techniques, it will be beneficial for museums to leverage those techniques for communicating.
    Christina has already raised the importance of the big data revolution to our ability to take advantage of visualization. I'd add to what she says that the important factor here isn't just that museums have (and continue to amass) huge amounts of data, but that we are getting better at organizing, labeling, normalizing, and manipulating it in order to support visualization. At the same time, external data sets (collection information created by our counterpart museums, or census data created by the government, or place data created by everyone from Foursquare to Wikipedia) is available to us to cross-tabulate with our own content--and that data too is more easily accessed and manipulated as more and more organizations publish APIs or issue public releases of their data. susan.chun Sep 1, 2011 rob.lancefield Sep 1, 2011
    (2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
    This has obviously also become more important across social networks and others beyond museums themselves, as shown by things like Facebook hiring Nicholas Felton (of the Feltron Report) , etc. Using visual data analysis to understand not just about ourselves but about others and use trends is more of a priority in many sectors. allegra.burnette Sep 1, 2011
    Another perspective here.
    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on education and interpretation in museums?
    Hiw about visualizing the chronologies our collections, the media of the objects we collect and our collecting history? The tendencies of our collections in terms of gender and culture? Even visualizing staff and resource allocations...beth.harris Aug 29, 2011
    Beth describes some great potential uses of visualization (both scholarly and operational). What's interesting here is that visualization of these sorts of topics supports both research, analysis, and scholarship AND teaching and learning for the general public. The same tools and techniques that allow researchers and practitioners to ask complex questions of enormous datasets also allow us to create simple infographics that may help us to communicate dense and confounding art historical/scientific ideas to our visitors. The New York Times and the Guardian (London) are doing a spectacular job of using infographics to augment and underline their reporting, and I think it's very possible for museum professionals to acquire the skill sets to do the same.
    (4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?
    holly Aug 20, 2011Visualizing Famine in the Horn of Africa http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/visualizing_famine_in_the_horn_of_africa_infograph.php?utm_source=ReadWriteWeb+Newsletters&utm_campaign=a6ec2428c5-RWWDailyNewsletter&utm_medium=email
    holly Aug 20, 2011While not a museum project the more museums can look at how other not-for-profits are using data visualization the more creative ideas museum professionals will produce
    beth.harris Aug 24, 2011 IMA Dashboard: http://dashboard.imamuseum.org/
    rob.stein Aug 30, 2011 Lev Manovich and the Cultural Analytics Lab at UCSD http://lab.softwarestudies.com/2008/09/cultural-analytics.html also his series on Style Space
    http://lab.softwarestudies.com/2011/08/style-space-how-to-compare-image-sets_29.html
    rob.stein Aug 30, 2011 Good blogs on visual data analysis http://infosthetics.com/ and http://www.visualcomplexity.com/vc/
    rob.stein Aug 30, 2011 Good (free) resources for creating viz http://www.tableausoftware.com/public and http://www-958.ibm.com/software/data/cognos/manyeyes/
    susan.chun Sep 1, 2011 Interesting opportunities to collaborate with outside experts intrigued by our datasets: Infosthetics Museum Visualization Competition: http://infosthetics.com/archives/2011/08/museum_visualization_competition_more_information.html; Data Without Borders Datadive:
    http://datawithoutborders.cc/events/nykickoff/
    Great festival earlier this year (not specific to museums, although some projects were included): http://eyeofestival.com/ allegra.burnette Sep 1, 2011
    [[include component="page" page="Project Form Link"]]

    (view changes)
    9:36 am
  7. page Virtual Worlds edited What are Virtual Worlds? [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav"]] Vir…

    What are Virtual Worlds?
    [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav"]]
    Virtual worlds are richly immersive and highly scalable 2- or 3-D environments. Most, but not all virtual worlds are multi-user spaces, meaning that many people can be in the same virtual space and interact with one another in real time, generally through a representation of themselves as an avatar. While many popular games take place in virtual worlds, virtual worlds are not themselves games. They are social environments over which a physical context can be laid. The most successful in an educational context are flexible spaces, and as such, it is quite common to find professional development activities like conferences and meetings taking place in settings such as Second Life®, OpenSim, Qwak, Active Worlds, and other immersive environments.
    The capability of virtual worlds has expanded considerably in the past few years, with enormous development in building tools, climate simulators, physics engines, and the overall capability of these platforms to simulate reality. Virtually every higher education institution has some sort of work going in around virtual spaces, and in just one platform alone, Linden Lab’s Second Life®, thousands of educational projects and experiments are actively underway, with over 20 million avatars.
    INSTRUCTIONS: Enter your responses to the questions below. This is most easily done by moving your cursor to the end of the last item and pressing RETURN to create a new bullet point. Please include URLs whenever you can (full URLs will automatically be turned into hyperlinks; please type them out rather than using the linking tools in the toolbar).
    Please "sign" your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples- this produces a signature when the page is updated, like this: Sam Jul 21, 2011
    (1) How might this technology be relevant to the museums you know best?
    I almost feel like the term "virtual worlds" implies the wrong question. It's like making a distinction between the "digital" and "real" worlds: for digital natives, it's all just the world. Discussions that used to be tagged "virtual worlds" are probably more appropriate now in the context of 3d and digital/social communities. nancy.proctor Sep 1, 2011 Good point Larry Sep 1, 2011
    Another perspective here.
    (2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
    holly Aug 9, 2011http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/second_life_makes_100m_a_year_in_revenue.php?utm_source=ReadWriteWeb+Newsletters&utm_campaign=b704d31298-RWWDailyNewsletter&utm_medium=email holly Aug 9, 2011Yes Linden Labs is still making money but for museums that are still involved in Second Life what is the ROI?
    Another perspective here.
    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on education and interpretation in museums?
    Another perspective here.
    (4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?
    holly Jul 26, 2011Smithsonian Latino Virtual Museum http://www.latino.si.edu/education/LVM_Main.htm
    jludden Aug 31, 2011http://www.whyville.net/smmk/top/gates?source=getty
    [[include component="page" page="Project Form Link"]]

    (view changes)
    9:36 am
  8. page Twitter edited Horizon Report in Twitter Follow what people are talking about on Twitter about the Horizon Rep…

    Horizon Report in Twitter
    Follow what people are talking about on Twitter about the Horizon Report.

    (view changes)
    9:36 am

More